Working in the Theatre: DIY Theatre

Theatre as one of the last handmade crafts is often created by those who can do it all. Just ask Normandy Sherwood, Milo Cramer, and Kristin Worrall, three Do It Yourself theatre-makers who are making theatre happen for themselves. As these three artists show us, anything is possible with persistence, creativity, and the power to balance a day job, a night at the theatre, and all the work that goes on in between.

About the Artists

“For the last 14 years that I’ve been making theater in New York, I’ve been working other jobs to support that work. I’ve done a variety of things, I’ve been a personal assistant, I’ve been a waitress, I also sometimes do costume design. I’ve worked with artists like Rachel Chavkin and Anne Washburn at Classic Stage Company, but for the last 9 years, I’d say, I’ve been a teacher. I teach college essay writing. It’s a full-time job, but I have the summers off and so I am able to do a lot of work during those times. A lot of writing and a lot of preparation for projects.” – Normandy Sherwood

For more info on Normandy, visit http://www.normandysherwood.com

“I like theater that is very theatrical, or uses a kind of stage language that more dynamic than just actor equal character. I like expressionistic kind of things. I think creative control is a myth. Control is so fragmented always. Theater is such a collaborative art form; nobody owns an event. A script is an invitation to collaborators to make something.” – Milo Cramer

For more information on Milo, visit https://newplayexchange.org/users/9546/milo-cramer

“The downtown theater scene is a real thing in New York City. There’s a real community there. Everyone who’s doing it mostly has another job. It’s not something we can all do that really can gain any real momentum because I think people are always struggling. It’s something that I’ve wanted really honestly to get out of. It’s not a model that, as I’ve said is sustainable nor do I want to participate in something where I feel like we as artists are not compensated fairly. New York, I think, is very difficult for people who are not fully produced or in companies. It’s always going to be a challenge, for sure.” – Kristin Worrall

For more info on Kristin, visit http://www.kristinworrall.com

For more info on American Theatre Wing, visit www.AmericanTheatreWing.org

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